Thursday, 13 August 2015

Safaa defends his PhD

Congratulations to Safaa H Shwail who recently successfully defended his PhD at the University of Babylon around optimal methods for path-planning with multi-robots. The work was rated 'excellent' and was supervised in Iraq by Dr Alia Karim.







Part the research was carried out at the University of Northampton with Dr Scott Turner (University of Northampton) for six months in 2013. During this time the work focussed on looking at two path-finding techniques within a multi-robot simulation. Details of this part of the work can be found below. 

Probabilistic Multi Robot Path Planning in Dynamic Environments: A Comparison between A* and DFS

Safaa H Shwail, Alia Karim and Scott Turner.
International Journal of Computer Applications


Abstract



In this paper, a probabilistic roadmap planner algorithm with the multi robot path planning problem have been proposed by using the A* search algorithm in a dynamic environment. The whole process consists of two phases. In the first phase: Preprocessing phase, the work space is converted into the configuration space, constructing a probabilistic roadmap graph in the free space, and finding the optimal path for each robot using a global planner that avoids the collision with thestatic obstacles. The second phase: Moving phase, moves each robot in a prioritized manner from its starting point to its ending point through a near optimal path with avoiding collision with the moving obstacles and the other robots. A comparison has been done with the depth first algorithm to see the difference. The simulation results shows that choosing A* search algorithm affect positively the speed of the two phases together in comparison to the depth first search algorithm. 




Citation
Safaa H Shwail, Alia Karim and Scott Turner. Article: Probabilistic Multi Robot Path Planning in Dynamic Environments: A Comparison between A* and DFS. International Journal of Computer Applications 82(7):29-34, November 2013. Published by Foundation of Computer Science, New York, USA
DOI: 
10.5120/14130-2251




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