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Dr Suraj Ajit: Recent Publications




ConEditor: Tool to Input and Maintain ConstraintsSuraj Ajit, Derek Sleeman, David W Fowler, David KnottDOI:Ajit, S., Sleeman, D., Fowler, D. W. and Knott, D. (2004) ConEditor: Tool to Input and Maintain Constraints. In: EKAW 2004. pp. 466-468.Source: OAIABSTRACT We present a tool which helps domain experts capture and maintain constraints. The tool displays parts of an ontology (as classes, sub-classes and properties) in the form of a tree. A number of keywords and operators from a constraint language are also listed. The tool helps a user to create a constraint expression. Additionally, the tool has a facility which allows the user to input tabular data. The expressed constraints can be converted into a standard format, making them portable. It is planned to integrate this tool, ConEditor, with Designers’ Workbench, a system that supports human designers.



Acquisition and Maintenance of Constraints in Engineering Design. InSuraj Ajit, Derek Sleeman, David W Fowler, David Knott, Kit HuiDOI:Ajit, S., Sleeman, D., Fowler, D. W., Knott, D. and Hui, K. (2005) Acquisition and Maintenance of Constraints in Engineering Design. In. In: KCAP-05. pp. 173-174.Source: OAIABSTRACT The Designers' Workbench is a system, developed by the Advanced Knowledge Technologies (AKT) consortium to support designers in large organizations, such as Rolls- Royce, by making sure that a design is consistent with the specification for the particular design as well as with the company’s design rule book(s). Currently, to capture the constraint information, a domain expert (design engineer) has to work with a knowledge engineer to identify the constraints, and it is then the task of the knowledge engineer to encode these into the Workbench's knowledge base (KB). This is an error prone and time consuming task. It is highly desirable to relieve the knowledge engineer of this task, and so we have developed a tool, ConEditor, that enables domain experts themselves to capture and maintain these constraints. The tool allows the user to combine selected entities from the domain ontology with keywords and operators of a constraint language to form a constraint expression. We hypothesize that to apply constraints appropriately, it is necessary to understand the context in which each constraint is applicable. We refer to this as "application conditions". We plan to make these application conditions machine interpretable and investigate how they, together with a domain ontology, can be used to support the verification and maintenance of constraints.



Capture and Maintenance of Engineering Design ConstraintsSuraj Ajit, Derek Sleeman, David W Fowler, David Knott, Kit HuiDOI:Ajit, S., Sleeman, D., Fowler, D. W., Knott, D. and Hui, K. (2005) Capture and Maintenance of Engineering Design Constraints. In: Research and Development in Intelligent Systems, Springer.Source: OAI


The role of ontologies in creating and maintaining corporate knowledge: a case study from the aero industryDerek Sleeman, Suraj Ajit, David W Fowler, David KnottDOI:Sleeman, D., Ajit, S., Fowler, D. W. and Knott, D. (2006) The role of ontologies in creating and maintaining corporate knowledge: a case study from the aero industry. In: FOMI-06 Workshop.Source: OAIABSTRACT The Designers’ Workbench is a system, developed to support designers in large organizations, such as Rolls-Royce, by making sure that the design is consistent with the specification for the particular design as well as with the company’s design rule book(s). The evolving design is described against a jet engine ontology. Currently, to capture the constraint information, a domain expert (design engineer) has to work with a knowledge engineer to identify the constraints, and it is then the task of the knowledge engineer to encode these into the Workbench’s knowledge base (KB). This is an error prone and time consuming task. It is highly desirable to relieve the knowledge engineer of this task, and so we have developed a tool, ConEditor+ that enables domain experts themselves to capture and maintain these constraints. The tool allows the user to combine selected entities from the domain ontology with keywords and operators of a constraint language to form a constraint expression. Further, we hypothesize that to apply constraints appropriately, it is necessary to understand the context in which each constraint is applicable. We refer to this as “application conditions”. We show that an explicit representation of application conditions, in a machine interpretable format, along with the constraints and the domain ontology can be used to support the verification and maintenance of constraints.



ConEditor+: Capture and Maintenance of Constraints in Engineering DesignSuraj Ajit, Derek Sleeman, David W Fowler, David Knott, Kit HuiDOI:Ajit, S., Sleeman, D., Fowler, D. W., Knott, D. and Hui, K. (2007) ConEditor+: Capture and Maintenance of Constraints in Engineering Design. In: IJCAI-07 Workshop on Knowledge Management and Organizational Memories. pp. 6-11.Source: OAIABSTRACT The Designers' Workbench is a system, developed to support designers in large organizations, such as Rolls-Royce, by making sure that the design is consistent with the specification for the particular design as well as with the company’s design rule book(s). Currently, to capture the constraint information, a domain expert (design engineer) has to work with a knowledge engineer to identify the constraints, and it is then the task of the knowledge engineer to encode these into the Workbench's knowledge base (KB). This is an error prone and time consuming task. It is highly desirable to relieve the knowledge engineer of this task, and so we have developed a tool, ConEditor+ that enables domain experts themselves to capture and maintain these constraints. The tool allows the user to combine selected entities from the domain ontology with keywords and operators of a constraint language to form a constraint expression. Further, we hypothesize that to apply constraints appropriately, it is necessary to understand the context in which each constraint is applicable. We refer to this as "application conditions". We show that an explicit representation of application conditions, in a machine interpretable format, along with the constraints and the domain ontology can be used to support the verification and maintenance of constraints.



Constraint capture and maintenance in engineering designSuraj Ajit, Derek Sleeman, David W Fowler, David KnottDOI:Ajit, S., Sleeman, D., Fowler, D. W. and Knott, D. (2008) Constraint capture and maintenance in engineering design. AI for Engineering Design, Analysis & Manufacturing, 22 . pp. 325-343.Source: OAIABSTRACT The Designers' Workbench is a system, developed by the Advanced Knowledge Technologies (AKT) consortium to support designers in large organizations, such as Rolls-Royce, to ensure that the design is consistent with the specification for the particular design as well as with the company's design rule book(s). In the principal application discussed here, the evolving design is described against a jet engine ontology. Design rules are expressed as constraints over the domain ontology. Currently, to capture the constraint information, a domain expert (design engineer) has to work with a knowledge engineer to identify the constraints, and it is then the task of the knowledge engineer to encode these into the Workbench's knowledge base (KB). This is an error prone and time consuming task. It is highly desirable to relieve the knowledge engineer of this task, and so we have developed a system, ConEditor+ that enables domain experts themselves to capture and maintain these constraints. Further we hypothesize that in order to appropriately apply, maintain and reuse constraints, it is necessary to understand the underlying assumptions and context in which each constraint is applicable. We refer to them as “application conditions” and these form a part of the rationale associated with the constraint. We propose a methodology to capture the application conditions associated with a constraint and demonstrate that an explicit representation (machine interpretable format) of application conditions (rationales) together with the corresponding constraints and the domain ontology can be used by a machine to support maintenance of constraints. Support for the maintenance of constraints includes detecting inconsistencies, subsumption, redundancy, fusion between constraints and suggesting appropriate refinements. The proposed methodology provides immediate benefits to the designers and hence should encourage them to input the application conditions (rationales).


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Social Analysis of Publications

The Computing staff's network of co-authors, at the University of Northampton, based on the University's  research repository NECTAR - http://nectar.northampton.ac.uk/view/divisions/SSTCT.html on 12th November 2016. The data goes back to 2010.




The data was analysed using the software VOSviewer - http://www.vosviewer.com/ free software for visualising networks. Differences in colours represents, the clusters of publications with those authors picked out by the software. The relative size of the circles is the relative number of publications listed; so for the two biggest circles/hubs it relates to 55 and 34 publications in this time period. Some relatively new authors, to the University but not to research, explains some of the 'islands' and the number of publications within it - it only reflects publications whilst at the University of Northampton.

To dig a little deeper, going to  look at the two biggest 'hubs' through their NECTAR records, so potentially going …

Computer lecturer’s research helps improve the next generation of technology

Taken from: http://www.northampton.ac.uk/news/computer-lecturers-research-helps-improve-the-next-generation-of-technology/ A computing lecturer at the University of Northampton, who is researching into how the efficiency of our everyday devices, such as mobile phones, can be improved, has been awarded the best paper at two recent conferences. Dr Michael Opoku Agyeman has written several journal papers focusing on how the next generation of technology can meet the ever increasing demands from consumers. He was invited to present his work at the 19th Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design in Cyprus and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ 14th International Conference in Paris. Part of his research concentrates on whether several processing elements can be incorporated on a single chip, known as System-On-Chip, to improve the efficiency and speed of the computing systems that we use every day, from mobile phones to video-game consoles and even medical equipment…