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student internationally published

A paper has been accepted for publication at The 2012 China-Europe International Symposium on Software Engineering Education (CEISEE’2012), with an finalist student from 2011 as one of the co-authors.

To avoid potential bias for work on student experience during a problem-solving module; from tutors and to get honest feedback, the survey data collection and some of the analysis was carried out by an undergraduate computing student (one of the co-authors Kumuditha Achini Kariyawasam) under an URB@N funded project. URB@N stands for 'Undergraduate Research Bursaries at Northampton'. It is a bursary scheme that offers undergraduate students an opportunity to participate in a pedagogic research project taking place at the University of Northampton




Is it Visual? The importance of a Problem solving Module within a computing course
K A Kariyawasam

S J Turner

G J Hill

ABSTRACT
This paper looks at student’s view of the usefulness of a problem solving and programming module in the first year of a 3-year undergraduate program. The School of Science and Technology, University of Northampton, UK has been investigating, over the last seven years the teaching of problem solving. Including looking at whether a more visual approach has any benefits (the visual programming includes both 2-d and graphical user interfaces). Whilst the authors have discussed the subject problem solving and programming in the past this paper considers the students perspective from research collected/collated by a student researcher under a new initiative within the University.

All students interviewed either had completed the module within the two years of the survey or were completing the problem-solving module in their first year.




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All views and opinions are the author's and do not necessarily reflected those of any organisation they are associated with. Twitter: @scottturneruon

Social Analysis of Publications

The Computing staff's network of co-authors, at the University of Northampton, based on the University's  research repository NECTAR - http://nectar.northampton.ac.uk/view/divisions/SSTCT.html on 12th November 2016. The data goes back to 2010.




The data was analysed using the software VOSviewer - http://www.vosviewer.com/ free software for visualising networks. Differences in colours represents, the clusters of publications with those authors picked out by the software. The relative size of the circles is the relative number of publications listed; so for the two biggest circles/hubs it relates to 55 and 34 publications in this time period. Some relatively new authors, to the University but not to research, explains some of the 'islands' and the number of publications within it - it only reflects publications whilst at the University of Northampton.

To dig a little deeper, going to  look at the two biggest 'hubs' through their NECTAR records, so potentially going …

Computer lecturer’s research helps improve the next generation of technology

Taken from: http://www.northampton.ac.uk/news/computer-lecturers-research-helps-improve-the-next-generation-of-technology/ A computing lecturer at the University of Northampton, who is researching into how the efficiency of our everyday devices, such as mobile phones, can be improved, has been awarded the best paper at two recent conferences. Dr Michael Opoku Agyeman has written several journal papers focusing on how the next generation of technology can meet the ever increasing demands from consumers. He was invited to present his work at the 19th Euromicro Conference on Digital System Design in Cyprus and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ 14th International Conference in Paris. Part of his research concentrates on whether several processing elements can be incorporated on a single chip, known as System-On-Chip, to improve the efficiency and speed of the computing systems that we use every day, from mobile phones to video-game consoles and even medical equipment…